Workshop on the governance of protected areas in Nepal

12 March 2008 | Event

The World Conservation Union (IUCN) Nepal and International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) facilitated the organization of a workshop on January 20, 2008, on the governance system of protected areas in Nepal. The workshop was primarily aimed at sharing experiences and knowledge towards effective and equitable system of protected areas, exploring protected areas governance mechanisms and how they can further the CBD Programme of Work (PoW) on Protected Areas.

The workshop, also co-sponsored by the Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation, National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC), WWF Nepal, World Commission on Protected Areas (WCPA) South Asia, IUCN Commission on Environment and Economic and Social Policy (CEESP/TGER) and the joint CEESP/WCPA Theme on Indigenous Local Communities and Protected Areas (TILCEPA), was a timely opportunity for protected area professionals  and indigenous/local  community representatives of Nepal to share ideas on new concepts and experiences, discuss emerging policy trends, and see how they could be practiced in the changing context of Nepal.

The technical sessions focused on the governance of protected areas and on how the concept could indeed help Nepal to develop an effective and equitable system of protected areas, fulfilling Nepal's obligations under the CBD Programme of Work on Protected Areas. The workshop was facilitated by Vice Chair of IUCN's Commission on Environmental Economics and Social Policy (CEESP) and World Commission on Protected Areas (WCPA) Dr. Grazia Borrini-Feyerabend.

Those speaking at the workshop titled "towards an effective and equitable system of protected areas in Nepal" included Hon. Member of the Legislative Parliament Prakash Jwala, secretaries of the Government of Nepal Dr. Swoyambhu Man Amatya and Dr. Uday Raj Sharma, IUCN Nepal Country Representative Prabhu Budhathoki, ICIMOD's Programme Coordinator Dr. Krishna Prasad Oli and Professor Stanely Stevens of the University of Massachusetts. The discussion primarily dwelt on protected area issues of greater relevance geared towards concrete and progressive policy interventions in Nepal.