A shining example for Park Managers

07 March 2013 | Fact sheet

Dr. Namkhai Bandi – finalist for the 2012 Kenton Miller Award for Innovation in Protected Area Management

As Executive Director of the Hustai National Park, Mongolia, Namkhai Bandi put in place an entirely new management system which made it a self-supporting park. Hustai National Park is the only NGO-managed Protected Area in Mongolia and one of the few in Asia. Dr. Bandi’s dedication ensured the park was not swept up in uncertain political changes, insecure funding streams and other challenging issues facing the country.

The park has been successful in reintroducing the Przewalski’s Horse, one of the rare cases of “declassification” of a species on the IUCN Red List of Endangered Species. Scientific monitoring of Przewalski Horses and their ecosystem is done regularly by ecovolunteers. The ecovolunteering has been quite successful, as it not only created year-round observations, but also motivates visitors, educates non-conservationists and brings income to the Park. The Przewalski’s Horse has quickly become the symbol of the newly won national identity of Mongolia.

Dr. Bandi and his staff are continuously introducing new methods to attract tourists to the Park, ensuring its financial sustainability. Hustai National Park has attracted donors for Tov Aimag (Central Province) who make substantial investments to implement projects outside the Park to the benefit of surrounding communities. The Park’s staff is associated with many activities in the buffer zone – the area immediately adjacent to the Park’s boundaries – including providing structural support to the organization of nomadic herdsmen and settled villagers. Hustai National Park and its buffer zone programme are often cited by the government and the business community of Mongolia in foreign relations discussions as a shining example of Mongolia’s progress.

Many high-ranking international guests come to Hustai to enjoy Mongolian nature and culture. Thanks to the Park’s autonomy, and in particular to Dr. Bandi’s visionary spirit, conservation continues to be a priority over other interests more destructive to the area, such as mining.

Dr Bandi’s NGO-based management of a protected area attracts national and international interest due to the stable institutional environment it provides. In this environment, nature thrives, and everyone benefits: the income that is raised is reinvested in the park, and ultimately local communicates benefit as well.As Executive Director of the Hustai National Park, Mongolia, Namkhai Bandi put in place an entirely new management system which made it a self-supporting park. Hustai National Park is the only NGO-managed Protected Area in Mongolia and one of the few in Asia. Dr. Bandi’s dedication ensured the park was not swept up in uncertain political changes, insecure funding streams and other challenging issues facing the country.

The park has been successful in reintroducing the Przewalski’s Horse, one of the rare cases of “declassification” of a species on the IUCN Red List of Endangered Species. Scientific monitoring of Przewalski Horses and their ecosystem is done regularly by ecovolunteers. The ecovolunteering has been quite successful, as it not only created year-round observations, but also motivates visitors, educates non-conservationists and brings income to the Park. The Przewalski’s Horse has quickly become the symbol of the newly won national identity of Mongolia.

Dr. Bandi and his staff are continuously introducing new methods to attract tourists to the Park, ensuring its financial sustainability. Hustai National Park has attracted donors for Tov Aimag (Central Province) who make substantial investments to implement projects outside the Park to the benefit of surrounding communities. The Park’s staff is associated with many activities in the buffer zone – the area immediately adjacent to the Park’s boundaries – including providing structural support to the organization of nomadic herdsmen and settled villagers. Hustai National Park and its buffer zone programme are often cited by the government and the business community of Mongolia in foreign relations discussions as a shining example of Mongolia’s progress.

Many high-ranking international guests come to Hustai to enjoy Mongolian nature and culture. Thanks to the Park’s autonomy, and in particular to Dr. Bandi’s visionary spirit, conservation continues to be a priority over other interests more destructive to the area, such as mining.

Dr Bandi’s NGO-based management of a protected area attracts national and international interest due to the stable institutional environment it provides. In this environment, nature thrives, and everyone benefits: the income that is raised is reinvested in the park, and ultimately local communicates benefit as well.

For , please see: http://www.iucn.org/about/work/programmes/gpap_home/pas_gpap/paoftheweek/?11876/The-worlds-last-wild-horses-have-returned-home For additional information on Hustai National Park, please see: http://www.iucn.org/about/work/programmes/gpap_home/pas_gpap/paoftheweek/?11876/The-worlds-last-wild-horses-have-returned-home