Documentation and Analysis of NBSAP Revision Processes

03 April 2014 | News story

National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans (NBSAPs) are the main vehicles of national implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity. They are processes through which societies come together to make the difficult decisions of where, when, and how biodiversity and ecosystem services should be conserved, used sustainably, and the benefits of this use shared equitably. Most countries that are Parties to the Convention have already developed at least one NBSAP.

While many Parties have conducted participatory biodiversity planning processes, there is often insufficient process documentation to allow a genuine reflection on effectiveness and/or on the limitations of these processes; and the effects of this on the implementation and the overall effectiveness of NBSAPs themselves. As a consequence, the wealth of country experiences in this crucial area is not being shared, learned from, nor built upon.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature, IUCN, in collaboration with the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity, with funding support from the Government of Japan, is thus launching a project to facilitate the documentation and analysis of NBSAP revision processes.

The project will be conducted in a limited number of countries through national researchers who will work closely with national NBSAP teams to document and analyze the process of NBSAP revision in their country. Progress and lessons will be shared through relevant side events both at the fifth meeting of the Working Group on Review of Implementation of the Convention (WGRI5) and the twelfth meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP12).

For more information, please contact:

Sonia.PenaMoreno@iucn.org

Maximilian.Mueller@iucn.org


This image shows the courtship behavior of Indian Bull frogs (Holobatrachus tigerinus). During the monsoon, the breeding males become bright yellow in color, while females remain dull. The prominent blue vocal sacs of male produce strong nasal mating call.