IUCN and TRAFFIC release CITES CoP15 Analyses of the Proposals

12 January 2010 | News story

In preparation for the upcoming CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna) meeting (15th meeting of the Conference of the Parties, CoP15) that will be taking place 13 – 25 March 2010 in Doha, Qatar, IUCN and TRAFFIC have released the results of their Analyses of the Proposals to Amend the Appendices. See here for the table with the Analyses.

The Analyses are prepared by IUCN and TRAFFIC as an objective assessment of whether the proposals meet the trade and biological criteria necessary for the proposed amendment to the listing of particular species within the Appendices of the Convention.

For CoP15, all forty-two proposals before the Parties to CITES were reviewed, although two are awaiting the outcomes from a meeting of a Panel of Experts. The results are posted here on this table.

The table includes the text of each proposal for CoP15 and alongside it is the associated IUCN and TRAFFIC Analyses. TRAFFIC is further making recommendations on whether each of the proposals should be accepted or rejected, based on the findings of the Analyses. These can be found on the TRAFFIC website.

IUCN and TRAFFIC would like to gratefully thank a number of CITES Parties who have contributed to this project, without which it would not have been possible to complete the project. The following have given support: European Commission, France, USA, Sweden, Germany, Switzerland, Netherlands, Monaco, Belgium, Finland and Denmark.

For more information on the CITES CoP15 meeting, please see the CITES webpage here. If you have any questions on how the Analyses was conducted or how IUCN is preparing for the upcoming CITES CoP15 meeting, please contact Dena Cator at dena.cator@iucn.org.


This image shows the courtship behavior of Indian Bull frogs (Holobatrachus tigerinus). During the monsoon, the breeding males become bright yellow in color, while females remain dull. The prominent blue vocal sacs of male produce strong nasal mating call.