IUCN Academy of Environmental Law Colloquium "Water and Law: Towards Sustainability"

14 September 2011 | News story

Professor Patricia Wouters, Director of the IHP-HELP Centre, on being named the Distinguished Scholar by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) for the July 2011 IUCN Academy of Environmental Law Colloquium "Water and Law: Towards Sustainability" in South Africa, said:

"I am humbled by this recognition, which recognizes the collective efforts of our entire Dundee team. We have benefited with strong institutional support for our work, and our water law, policy and science interdisciplinary expertise at the Centre has made a real difference in providing innovative approaches to addressing local and international issues related to the management of shared fresh water resources. From the inception of our IHP-HELP Centre, our vision has been “promoting water for all”, through our mission to build a new generation of local water leaders based upon our research and our Water Law Water Leaders graduate teaching and training programme.”

IHP-HELP Team at IUCN Colloquium
• Dr Alistair Rieu-Clarke: "the 1997 UN Watercourses Convention and Ecosystem Services: Can a Combined Reading Ensure that International Watercourses are Utilised in an Equitable and Reasonable Manner?"
• Pre-Colloquium session wrap-up by Prof. Alejandro Omar Iza
• Monday 4 July 2011, "Day 1": Distinguished Scholar address, Prof Patricia Wouters: "Water and the Law; Towards Sustainability: Dynamic Cooperation" (slideshare now available) Mr Musa Abseno: "Dispelling scepticism? The role and relevance of the 1997 UN Watercourses Convention in resolving transboundary water disputes".
• Dr Alistair Rieu-Clarke: "Can international law solve transboundary water conflicts?"
• Ana Maria Daza Vargas: "Resilient and flexible water regulation vs predictable rules for international investment protection"


This image shows the courtship behavior of Indian Bull frogs (Holobatrachus tigerinus). During the monsoon, the breeding males become bright yellow in color, while females remain dull. The prominent blue vocal sacs of male produce strong nasal mating call.