IUCN - IUCN Experts on IPBES benefits

IUCN Experts on IPBES benefits

16 December 2011 | News story

Tune in to a series of interviews and find out what is the role and benefits of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). The interviews include various biodiversity experts from international organizations, NGOs, academia and scientific bodies - among these IUCN and its Members.

Many experts recognized that IPBES will be the only global and authoritative mechanism that brings information together and synthesizes and analyses it for decision making in a range of policy fora, such as the global environmental conventions and development policy dialogues

Julia Marton-Lefevre, IUCN Director-General, in the IUCN interview on the outcomes of the First Plenary Session to Build IPBES in Nairobi, in October 2011 notes that establishing working rules for an international independent body with a broad mandate, such as that of the IPBES, is challenging, and that its efficiency and effectiveness will depend on its delivery of reliable reports and services.

Cyrie Sendashonga, IUCN Global Director, Policy and Planning Group, in the interview with the IPBES Secretariat (UNEP) during the First IPBES Plenary Session describes the role of civil society organizations and how these might engage with IPBES.

Robert Watson, UK’s Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), an IUCN Member, in the interview with the IPBES Secretariat (UNEP) during the First IPBES Plenary Session suggested that the only way for IPBES to function effectively is if developing nations have ownership over any ecosystem assessments conducted in-country, and if these are conducted by scientists from that nation.

Jeff McNeely, IUCN advisor and representative of the Society for Conservation Biology, an IUCN Member, in the interview with UNESCO explains why IPBES is necessary.

Bill Jackson, former IUCN Deputy Director General, in the IUCN interview prior to the CBD negotiations in Nairobi, in May 2010 talks about IUCN’s support for the creation of IPBES.

Listen to these and other interviews on the official IPBES website.


This image shows the courtship behavior of Indian Bull frogs (Holobatrachus tigerinus). During the monsoon, the breeding males become bright yellow in color, while females remain dull. The prominent blue vocal sacs of male produce strong nasal mating call.