Dr Tim Ragen to stand down from WGWAP

15 January 2008 | News story

IUCN regrets to announce the resignation of Dr Tim Ragen from the WGWAP. Earlier this month, Dr Ragen announced that he will not be renewing his engagement for 2008. 

Dr Ragen has made a significant contribution to the western gray whale conservation initiative since the establishment, by IUCN, of the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) in 2004. As Scientific Program Director of the U.S. Marine Mammal Commission, he was instrumental in getting the ISRP off the ground. He then assumed much of the responsibility for its review of oil spill risks and cumulative effects.

IUCN regrets to announce the resignation of Dr Tim Ragen from the WGWAP. Earlier this month, Dr Ragen announced that he will not be renewing his engagement for 2008.

Dr Ragen has made a significant contribution to the western gray whale conservation initiative since the establishment, by IUCN, of the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) in 2004. As Scientific Program Director of the U.S. Marine Mammal Commission, he was instrumental in getting the ISRP off the ground. He then assumed much of the responsibility for its review of oil spill risks and cumulative effects.

His long prior experience of analysing environmental impact assessments, his expertise in ecological modeling, and his all-around knowledge of marine mammal science and conservation made Dr Ragen a key member of the ISRP and successive panels at every stage - he co-chaired the Lenders' Workshop in September 2005 and took a lead role in the WGWAP's Oil Spill Task Force.

WGWAP Chairman, Dr Randall Reeves, sums up Dr Ragen’s contribution as follows:

Tim brought to the proceedings diligence, seriousness, a probing intellect, and a broad knowledge of relevant fields, all leavened with a great sense of humor.

IUCN will seek nominations of qualified individuals to serve on the WGWAP, to ensure that the existing skill set and technical capacity of the WGWAP are maintained.


This image shows the courtship behavior of Indian Bull frogs (Holobatrachus tigerinus). During the monsoon, the breeding males become bright yellow in color, while females remain dull. The prominent blue vocal sacs of male produce strong nasal mating call.