Tales of 12 species: Conservation or destruction?

07 October 2008 | News story

The book Adrift: Tales of Ocean Fragility was launched today, with stories of curious sharks and ghost fishing on high seas.

Numerous campaigns have been launched to save the oceans and charismatic species such as whales and turtles, but sometimes there are so many they can fall on deaf ears.

Adrift, Tales of Ocean Fragility, has been designed to showcase the diversity of life in the oceans and conservation challenges by telling the stories of 12 species, each facing different threats to their future. It highlights issues related to the conservation of some of the most interesting and least understood creatures on earth.

“While their many problems herald massive challenges for us humans, their stories promise a better future as we learn to preserve them and the many benefits that they, in turn, give to us,” said Dr. Holly Dublin, Chair of IUCN Species Survival Commission.

She added that the stories reveal some surprising successes and are a testament to the many thousands of volunteers of IUCN’s Species Survival Commission who alert the world to the condition of its natural heritage and seek solutions to ensure its future.

“This book is a wake up call to urgently conserve marine life forms into the public eye through a series of compelling stories,” said Nicholas Pilcher, marine biologist and one of the authors of the book. “The marvelous tales assembled here are testament not only to the eccentricity of our marine life, but also the diversity of challenges and opportunities we face to conserve these species.”
 


This image shows the courtship behavior of Indian Bull frogs (Holobatrachus tigerinus). During the monsoon, the breeding males become bright yellow in color, while females remain dull. The prominent blue vocal sacs of male produce strong nasal mating call.