IUCN - IUCN at the United Nations Intersessional Workshops on Biodiversity beyond National Jurisdiction

IUCN at the United Nations Intersessional Workshops on Biodiversity beyond National Jurisdiction

17 May 2013 | News story

According to UNGA Resolution 67/78, two intersessional workshops were organized from 2-3 and 6-7 May 2013 in New York as part of the work undertaken by the UN Ad Hoc Open-ended Informal Working Group to study issues relating to the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity beyond areas of national jurisdiction (UN BBNJ).

The objective of the workshops was to improve understanding of the issues related to the conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ), and to clarify key questions as an input to the next UN BBNJ meeting from 19-23 August 2013. The IUCN Environmental Law Centre was invited to speak on “Exploring different benefits and benefit-sharing approaches” during workshop one which focused on marine genetic resources. In order to inform participants on the different topics of this workshop, the Environmental Law Centre, in collaboration with different experts, prepared a series of information documents (download here).

In addition, the IUCN Environmental Law Centre participated in a side event on Marine Bioprospecting – organized by the Fridtjof Nansen Institute – and spoke on “Potential options for linking benefit-sharing, conservation and sustainable use”. The IUCN Global Marine and Polar Programme had the opportunity to present on “Existing regimes, experiences and best practices” during workshop two which addressed conservation and management tools, including area-based management and environmental impact assessments. For further information on the workshops as well as the UN BBNJ process see http://www.un.org/Depts/los/biodiversityworkinggroup/biodiversityworkinggroup.htm.


This image shows the courtship behavior of Indian Bull frogs (Holobatrachus tigerinus). During the monsoon, the breeding males become bright yellow in color, while females remain dull. The prominent blue vocal sacs of male produce strong nasal mating call.